Journeying Toward Wholeness

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The Journey toward Wholeness | Jungian Psychotherapy

How Depth Psychotherapy Can Help

-By Brian Collinson, RP  I am frequently asked, “What kind of clients come to see you, and what kinds of things do they talk about?” Here are some typical examples.

Different issues come to the fore depending on the life circumstances and personality of the individual. Every person’s situation is unique, but some examples of common themes are reflected in the composite stories that appear below.

(PLEASE NOTE: CLIENT CONFIDENTIALITY AND PRIVACY ARE PARAMOUNT CONCERNS. This material is based on substantive experiences in Jungian psychotherapy with many clients. However, all identifying details have been changed or removed to safeguard the identities and personal information of clients.  Composite cases below are based upon typical interactions with several clients.)

Case Studies

A: Woman’s Midlife Transition

A, a woman at midlife, grieved the loss of an extremely important female role model and mentor. Through depth psychotherapy, this crisis turned into the discovery of new meaning, self-awareness and direction in her life. See Loss and Discovery of Identity

B: Career and Real Life in Midlife Transition

B, a lawyer and consultant, underwent a profound crisis over his all-consuming work life, which suddenly felt meaningless. B’s story is about transition to another career, and to a whole different orientation to life, work and others. Male Turmoil at the Transition

C: Smart, Pretty, Well-Married & “Running Out of Gas”

“C”, 33, was smart, pretty, and well-married — yet everything in life felt flavourless, and she was deeply questioning all her major life choices. C’s extensive work in therapy led to new feelings, new thoughts, and a sense of energized, previously unknown, possibilities. Suburban Life Transition

D: Grief and Loss

“D”, 55, lost her spouse in a tragic accident. Her friendly husband had been D’s main connection to others, and his loss led to overwhelming loneliness and isolation. Through Jungian psychotherapy, D connected with her own extroversion, finding confidence to connect with others in her unique self. Grief and Loss

E: Relationship Breakdown

E 35, was a businessperson in a high-pressure role. E genuinely loved his spouse, who had an affair and left the relationship. This led to panic, depression, and deep feelings of rejection and loss of identity. Through exploration of his feelings and dreams, E found a more secure orientation to his life. When Love Ends

F: Job Loss

F, 49, dismissed from an upper middle management role after 20 years, felt anger, grief and betrayal. He felt involuntary rage, and also humiliation, devaluation and loss. Through Jungian psychotherapy work, gradually a deeper sense of self, and of identity beyond his work role began to emerge. Work and Life

Contact Brian Collinson, RP for more information on life situations that bring people to depth psychotherapy / Jungian therapy, or to book a consultation: